Evaluation of Breast Cancer Risk in Relation to Occupation

Ehsan Rafeemanesh, Ali Taghizadeh Kermani, Mohammad Khajedaluee, Fatemeh Ahmadi

Abstract


Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in females. At present, evidence exists to support an association of breast cancer with several risk factors such as occupational risk factors. The aim of this study is to further characterize potential associations between breast cancer risk and occupation.

Methods: In this case-control study, we reviewed records from 965 histologically confirmed breast cancer cases. From these, 104 employed women were chosen. The control group consisted of 112 age-matched employed women. Required data were gathered through in-person interviews and medical records reviews. Occupations were classified into four categories: teachers, administrative/clerical workers, healthcare workers, and miscellaneous jobs. Data analysis was performed using the chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression model.

Results: A higher proportion of cases (60.6%) were teachers. Physical activity, smoking, and family history of cancer significantly differed between the case and control groups. After adjustment for potential confounders, we found that teachers had a higher risk for breast cancer compared to other occupations (P<0.001).

Conclusion: The teaching profession can be an important risk factor for breast cancer. Emphasis on early screening programs seems necessary. According to the high percent of female teachers, we recommend a detailed evaluation of exposures in this occupation.


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eISSN: 2008-6687           pISSN: 2008-6709